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Steroid source in India busted.

The local drug controller has seized steroids worth Rs 2 lakh from a house in Attavar on Wednesday. The accused Santosh Shetty had stocked the steroids and was selling it to body builders without licence. Assistant Drug Controller KV Nagaraj said that based on a tip-off, the raid was carried by drug inspector Ashalatha. The drugs were procured from Bangalore and Mumbai. They did not have MRP and look imported, said Nagaraj. The accused was selling the drugs, which were in the form of injection and tablets, from the past one year. If the charges are proved that the accused was selling drugs without licence it attracts imprisonment up to three years and a fine of Rs 1 lakh. A case has been booked against the accused under Section-200 of CrPC.

Canadian bodybuilder fined for UG lab operation.

The Canada Border Services Agency says a Halifax man has been fined $50,000 for smuggling and distributing anabolic steroids. Greg Austin Doucette was sentenced in Halifax provincial court on three charges under the Customs Act and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act. Doucette was also handed a 20-month conditional sentence and one year of probation. The agency says Doucette must also forfeit all materials and cash seized by officers. The investigation began in July 2010 when border officers at a mail centre in Vancouver intercepted several shipments of steroids destined for Halifax. During a subsequent search of Doucette's property, officers seized $23,000 in cash, more than $250,000 worth in steroids and steroid distribution materials and 56 envelopes containing raw testosterone powder. Doucette, who was charged in October 2012, is a high-profile body builder. According to the Nova Scotia Amateur Body Building Association's website, Doucette most recently placed first in the men's heavyweight category in 2012.

British celebrity trainer busted for sterod dealing in Australia.

Police believe a personal trainer at an elite Sydney gym, arrested following the discovery of $600,000 worth of drugs, is one of the eastern suburbs’ major players in cocaine, steroids and ecstasy distribution. Lee Clark, who worked out of the Fitness First Bondi Platinum gym at Bondi Junction, was arrested allegedly in possession of $155,000 in cash as well as the major quantity of drugs. Bondi Platinum is used by Nicole Kidman and Hugh Jackman when they are in Sydney but is not under investigation. It is understood Clark’s client list will also be scrutinised as part of ongoing inquiries by detectives. Clark was a franchisee personal trainer who has since been suspended by Fitness First, which is assisting police. Clark came to light during an investigation by Operation Polaris, a joint task force between the NSW Police Force, Australian Federal Police, Australian Customs and Border Protection Service and Australian Crime Commission investigating organised crime on the Sydney waterfront. The 37-year-old Clark kept a low profile and was not a target of the investigation, codenamed Nagami, but was linked to a man working on the Sydney waterfront who was allegedly involved in the supply of illicit drugs. “The quantities seized lead us to believe this is a major drug distribution ring in the eastern suburbs,’’ said Detective Superintendent Nick Bingham, Commander of Polaris. “Part of the ongoing investigation will be the supply network involved in the alleged drug syndicate.” Clark, a UK national who has been living in Australia for the past two decades, was arrested at his Randwick apartment three weeks ago. A Vaucluse man was also charged with a number of drug related charges and granted bail. Clark was refused bail on March 27 on charges of trafficking in marketable quantity of a controlled drug and dealing with the proceeds of crime to reappear before the courts in June. Police allege a rented garage in Sutherland St, Paddington was used as a “safe house’’ to store the drugs where they found nearly 1kg of MDMA, capable of producing about 4000 ecstasy tablets with an estimated street value of $200,000, 500g of cocaine with a street value of $400,000, a large amount of prescription medication, a large amount of steroids, cash, a hydraulic press and other items believed to have been used in the manufacture of illegal drugs were seized by police. They also impounded $155,000 cash, $120,000 of which was found in a safety deposit box at a storage facility at Camperdown. A unit on Kimberley St, Vaucluse was searched and a small amount of methylamphetamine, steroids, electronic equipment and identification documents were found. At Clark’s St Marks Rd unit in Randwick they allegedly found numerous resealable bags containing powder (suspected of being an illicit drug), prescription drugs, a large amount of steroids, cash, electronic equipment and financial documents.

Underground steroid lab busted.

The two young men arrested in a multi-agency bust on a drug lab operation may have been surprised, but at least one of their Strathcona neighbours wasn't. Dan McDonald and his brother say they spotted police surveillance on the modest New Street home weeks ago. "There was a surveillance car there the last couple of weeks — sitting right out front of my steps. My brother noticed them first — always the same three guys." Ironically, McDonald said he's never really noticed the two men arrested at the house Wednesday morning. "I knew the previous couple — helped build the front steps for them — but they moved out about six months ago. I don't know when these men moved in." During the raid, OPP, Hamilton investigators and special teams moved in, striking against what they say is a suspected illegal steroid lab being run out of a modest home at 49 New St. It's the second such raid in Hamilton in a matter of weeks, and OPP Detective Staff Sergeant Scott Mills confirmed it's no coincidence. "Yes, they're related," he said. He also said the investigation is an ongoing probe and is multi-jurisdictional, "not just in Hamilton." The two arrested men — whom Mills declined to identify — were expected to be released on a promise to appear in court at a future date. Mills said investigators did recover suspected steroids from the scene as well as an assortment of "powders and chemicals," yet to be identified by OPP chemists. Asked about the quantity of illegal steroids found in the unobtrusive, semidetached home, Mills would only say that in his opinion there were enough to warrant charges of possession for the purpose of trafficking. Steroids are a controlled substance, sometimes classified as a PIED — a performance or image enhancing drug. Rhonda Henry, who grew up one door away from the suspected drug lab, and moved back home a few years ago, said the two men "were nice guys, no trouble at all." In other words, not the type one would associate with running a clandestine steroid lab. "They definitely weren't bodybuilders," said Henry. "At least they didn't look like bodybuilders," she added with a laugh. "They were pretty average looking. I helped shovel snow off their sidewalk, they'd brush the snow off my car." So-called clandestine steroid labs are more like packaging houses — pressing powder into pills, or mixing it in solution and packaging it for injection. The absence of heat, fire and volatile chemicals make them potentially less hazardous than other drug labs, Mills admitted, but he says a provincewide protocol requires police to err on the side of safety. On Wednesday morning the small street was chaotic and crowded, with the raid team shutting the street down and erecting blue polypropylene decontamination tents opposite the house. Men with hazardous material suits moved in and out of the building, and fire and EMS waited for trouble that never materialized. New Street, one block east of Dundurn Street, was closed to traffic for six hours by the operation, reopening just after 3 p.m.

Gym owner arrested for running undergound steroid lab.

Major domestic source Mutagenic.co busted.

A former employee of Global Health and Fitness on Elm Road in Warren was arraigned Tuesday morning in Trumbull County Common Pleas Court, accused of helping a 22-year-old Bazetta Township man sell anabolic steroids. The identities of customers who bought the illegal drugs have not been released by prosecutors or investigators, and charges against them are not planned, investigators said. Randy A. McCale, 46, of Neil Street in Niles, pleaded not guilty to felony corruption for helping operate the enterprise and five counts of identity fraud for purportedly providing personal information about current and former Global Fitness customers to at least one other person in the enterprise. Investigators said McCale provided a list of names, birthdates, Social Security numbers and other personal information to Joseph A. Stiver, 22, of Cadwallader-Sonk Road in Bazetta Township. Stiver used the information to create PayPal accounts in their names that then were used to pay for the illegal steroids, according to an affidavit unsealed in the case. McCale was released from custody after agreeing to a list of conditions imposed by the county Adult Probation Department. Stiver pleaded not guilty Monday to 17 charges, including corruption, four counts of identity fraud, eight counts of drug trafficking and four counts of tampering with evidence. Judge Ronald Rice reduced Stiver’s bond to $50,000, but he remained in jail Tuesday afternoon. Stiver and McCale face the possibility of more than 10 years in prison. The affidavit said McCale and Stiver cooperated with investigators with the Trumbull Ashtabula Group Law Enforcement Task Force, which investigated the enterprise. Bill Myers, owner of Global Fitness, said McCale used to work the front desk at Global Fitness. Myers said the personal information McCale released was for former club members, who were notified of the data breach, and none of them has experienced any problems as a result, he said. Prosecutors said the 140 people whose information was released were “innocent victims.” Investigators spoke with several of the victims, and all said they didn’t know Stiver. The use of steroids by body builders is widespread and occurs in “any gym all over the world,” he said, adding that steroids are “out there everywhere.” He said athletes of all kinds “try to get away with things like that,” but he added of the criminal charges and investigation, “Hopefully it will wake all these guys up.” Myers said he has had “no problem of any kind” during 17 years of operating fitness centers and doesn’t expect this to hurt his business. He didn’t know Stiver, he added. Investigators said Stiver sold anabolic steroids through a national Internet business called Mutagenic with help from McCale and others. Stiver ran the website from cellphones and computers and had more than $175,000 stashed in a briefcase in the attic above his bedroom of the home on Cadwallader-Sonk where he lives with his parents. Investigators say their investigation began Dec. 11, 2013, when Bazetta police investigated a break-in at E-Z Self Storage, which is near Global Fitness, and found a “workshop.” Inside, they later determined, were boxes of Testosterone Cypionate, which is an anabolic steroid or performance-enhancing drug. Also found were hypodermic needles, pills and a piece of notebook paper containing handwritten Social Security numbers. Two men are indicted on several counts for their roles in an online steroid scheme. It was a typical follow up to a break-in last December, when Bazetta Township police and undercover officers found what appeared to be a workshop inside a storage unit that were stocked with performance enhancing drugs. TAG law enforcement officials obtained a search warrant and removed items from the E-Z Storage unit off of Bazetta Road shortly after. They removed empty and full vials, pills, needles, boxes and a paper list containing names, their birth dates and social security numbers. To learn more about what the unit was being used for, authorities traced a package addressed to an individual in Niles to meet their first suspect-- Randy McCale. McCale worked at Global Fitness off of Elm Road for three years at the front desk where he often sold memberships. He told authorities he was paid by Joseph Stiver, 22, of Bazetta, to provide him with a list of clients from the gym. Stiver is accused of running an internet steroid business known as "Mutagenic". Authorities say he used the gym's client's names and personal information to set up PayPal accounts to launder money. McCale told TAG he was hired by Stiver to handle package deliveries and pick ups. McCale was indicted on six counts including complicity to engage in a patter of corrupt activity and identity fraud. He appeared in Trumbull County Common Pleas court for his arraignment Tuesday, where his bond was set at $25,000. A search at Stivers home turned up steroids and almost $175,000. Stiver was indicted on 17 counts, including engaging in a patter of corrupt activity, trafficking drugs, identity fraud and tampering with evidence.

Two Australians jailed for 25kg of imported testosterone powder.

An investigation by the Australian Customs and Border Service (ACBPS) has resulted in the sentencing of two men in the Sydney District Court yesterday for importing over 26 kilograms of testosterone into Australia. A 36-year-old man was sentenced to two years imprisonment, while a 38-year-old man to three years imprisonment. The investigation began on Monday, 17 December 2012, when ACBPS officers in Sydney examined three separate parcels from China. Several plastic containers in the parcels were opened and found to contain a white powdery substance, which initially tested positive for testosterone. On Thursday, 20 December 2012, ACBPS officers conducted a controlled delivery of the parcels, along with a number of search warrants. The men were subsequently linked to the parcels and were arrested. Both were charged with one count of Section 233BAA (4) of the Customs Act 1901 for importing over 26 kilograms of an anabolic-androgenic steroid (testosterone). ACBPS Acting National Manager Investigations, Paul Benussi, said the sentences were a significant warning to others thinking of importing performance and image enhancing drugs without a permit. “Customs and Border Protection takes the prohibited importation of drugs seriously and will pursue legal action to ensure offenders face the full force of the law,” Mr Benussi said. The maximum penalty for this offence is a fine of up to $170,000 and/or up to five years in prison.

Australian gets heavy fine for importing Thai Dianabol.

An Australian Customs and Border Protection Service (ACBPS) investigation has resulted in the conviction and fining of a 29-year-old Canberra man in the Queanbeyan Local Court yesterday for importing steroids into Australia. The man was ordered to pay over $11,000. The ACBPS investigation began on 2 April 2013, when officers at the Sydney International Mail Facility detected two packages containing a steroid (methandienone) from Thailand. On 8 May 2013, ACBPS officers executed search and seizure warrants across addresses in the Australian Capital Territory. The man was subsequently charged with two counts of importing prohibited imports, namely methandienone, contrary to section 233 (1) (b) of the Customs Act 1901, and one count of possess prohibited imports contrary to section 233(1)(d) of the Customs Act 1901. The man was yesterday convicted and fined $6000 for two counts of importing prohibited imports ($3000 for each count); $1000 for possessing prohibited imports; and ordered to pay $4,066.32 to ACBPS for professional costs. The total due is $11,066.32. ACBPS Acting National Manager Investigations, Paul Benussi, said the conviction demonstrates the scope of ACBPS investigations across Australia. “It doesn’t matter where you live in Australia. If you bring prohibited drugs across the border, we will seize them and you could face serious penalties,” Mr Benussi said. “It might seem tempting to import the drugs from countries where they are freely available, but Australia has strict laws to control their importation.” The maximum penalty for this offence is a fine of up to $170,000 and/or up to five years in gaol.

Delaware woman allegedly laced husband's injectable steroids with antifreeze.

A Smyrna woman has been charged with murder after police say she admitted lacing her husband's steroid injections with antifreeze. State police say 44-year-old Jamie Baker was arrested on Thursday and charged with first-degree murder in the death of her husband, 42-year-old James Baker. James Baker died in September. An autopsy revealed he had a chemical found in antifreeze in his system, and his death was ruled homicide by poisoning. Following his death, police found syringes and liquid steroids in his home. Police say he had ordered the steroids through the Internet. Police searched the home again on Thursday, and police say Jamie Baker told officers that she had used a hypodermic syringe to extract antifreeze from a bottle and then injected it into her husband's bottles of steroids.